Bittersweet

Solanum dulcamara One of the most familiar objects in the hedgerows and moist places is the trailing stem of the Bittersweet or Woody Nightshade. Flowering from June to September. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Heath Spotted-Orchid

Dactylorhiza maculata Occurs commonly in damp places in all parts of the country, in meadows, pastures and open woods, on stiff soils and on chalk downs. Flowering from June – occasionally in May – to as late as August. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Yellow Iris

Iris pseudacorus Fringing our rivers, ditches and lakes the Yellow Iris will be found abundantly throughout Britain. Flowering in May and continuing until late July. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Honeysuckle

Lonicera periclymenum Widely distributed in hedges, copses and on heaths, this is one of the most familiar of our wild flowers. It owes its popularity not only to the beauty of its flowers, but also to its sweet scent and twining habit. Flowering summer and autumn. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W.Continue reading “Honeysuckle”

Welsh Poppy

Meconopsis cambrica Although the name suggests that this plant is restricted to Wales, this is not actually the case. Western Poppy would, perhaps, be the more appropriate name for it. Its natural range extends from Yorkshire, southwards through Wales and Somerset to Devon and Cornwall. Its favourite haunts are beside rivulets, moist and shady rockyContinue reading “Welsh Poppy”

Yellow Rattle

Rhinanthus minor In meadows and pastures the Yellow Rattle is abundant, where it is parasitical upon the roots of other plants. The yellow flowers render it very conspicuous, and its identity is readily established by the light green inflated calyx. The flowers will be found from May to August. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers,Continue reading “Yellow Rattle”

Yellow Loosestrife

Lysimachia vulgaris The Yellow Loosestrife will be found on river banks and in wet, shady places, chiefly in England. The flowers are dimorphic and appear from June to August. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Wood Betony

Betonica officinalis Betonica: Variant of Vettonica, a Spanish native plant, and vernacular name for Stachys officinalisofficinalis: Official – used in pharmacological sense(Dave’s Garden Botanary)

Wood Sorrel

Oxalis acetosella One of the most graceful and charming of our native plants. It abounds in moist, shady woods. A favourite position for it is the rotten centre of some old beech stump from which it will spread in a loose cluster, or growing on the ground, often in great abundance. Flowering April and MayContinue reading “Wood Sorrel”

Wood Avens

Geum urbanum Geum: Ancient Latin nameurbanum: Of cities(Dave’s Garden Botanary) On the borders of woods, in copses, and on shady hedgebanks, the Avens is abundant. Flowering chiefly between June and August. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Wood Anemone

Anemone nemorosa Anemone: Wind; or possibly corrupted from Hebrew referring to the lament for slain Adonis, whose blood produced the red Adonis or Anemone coronarianemorosa: Of the woods(Dave’s Garden Botanary) One of the earliest of the spring flowers to be found in copses, by the woodside and in upland meadows. Flowering from March to June.Continue reading “Wood Anemone”

Wild Strawberry

Fragaria vesca Wherever there are shady banks and woodland clearings, this charming little plant is sure to be met with. Flowering nearly the whole summer. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)