Barren Strawberry

Potentilla sterilis Potentilla: Little (size) powerful one, refers to medicinal propertiessterilis: Sterile(Dave’s Garden Botanary) To be found on banks, dry pastures and in open woods, the Barren Strawberry is one of the earliest of the flowering plants to make its presence known. It is often mistaken by the rambler for the true Wild Strawberry, owingContinue reading “Barren Strawberry”

Bifid Hemp-nettle

Galeopsis bifida Galeopsis: From the Greek gale (weasel) and opsis (resembling)bifida: Split into two(Dave’s Garden Botanary)

Bittersweet

Solanum dulcamara One of the most familiar objects in the hedgerows and moist places is the trailing stem of the Bittersweet or Woody Nightshade. Flowering from June to September. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Bluebell

Hyacinthoides non-scripta Abundant in woods, hedges and shady places throughout Britain. Flowering in April and May. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Bramble

Rubus fruticosus In hedges, thickets and waste places, the Bramble abounds everywhere. Flowering from June to September. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Bush Vetch

Vicia sepium In hedges, woods and bushy places the Bush Vetch will frequently be found. Flowering from June to September. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Cat’s Ear

Hypochaeris radicata Plentiful in meadows, pastures and waste places throughout the country. In appearance it comes pretty close to the Hawkweeds, which roughly resemble it, especially in colour. The flowering period extends from June to September. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Columbine

Aquilegia vulgaris Although the Columbine is a true native of our woods one should be chary of assuming its wildness when found near existing houses or former dwellings. Flowering from May to July The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Common Sorrel

Rumex acetosa Abundant throughout the country in moist meadows, pastures and woods. Flowering from May to August The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Cowslip

Primula veris In clayey meadows and pastures throughout England and Ireland the Cowslip is abundant; in Scotland rare. The flowering period is during April and May. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Daffodil

Narcissus pseudonarcissus The Daffodil as a wild plant in England is extremely local, but where it occurs it is usually in great profusion. Flowering in March and April. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Dandelion

Taraxacum officinale In meadows, pastures, cultivated and waste places everywhere the Dandelion is to be found. Flowering from March to October. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Dog Rose

Rosa canina In hedges and copses throughout Britain the Dog Rose may be found. It is the largest of the British wild roses. The flowering period extends from June to August. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Field Scabious

Knautia arvensis In dry fields and on downs, and cultivated places throughout Britain, the Field Scabious may be found. The flowering period is from June to September. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Foxglove

Digitalis purpurea One of the best-known flowers of the countryside, and familiar for the masses of purple blooms it presents on dry wastes and woodland slopes throughout Britain. Flowering from June to September. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Ground Ivy

Glechoma hederacea The Ground Ivy will be found trailing among the grass of the copse and hedgebank. It is very abundant in Britain and one of the earliest of flowers to appear in the spring. It has not the remotest relationship with the real Ivy. It is also known as Ale-hoof and Tun-hoof, being formerlyContinue reading “Ground Ivy”

Heath Spotted-Orchid

Dactylorhiza maculata Occurs commonly in damp places in all parts of the country, in meadows, pastures and open woods, on stiff soils and on chalk downs. Flowering from June – occasionally in May – to as late as August. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Hemp Agrimony

Eupatorium cannabinum Eupatorium: Named for Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus about 115 BC who is said to have discovered an antidote to a commonly used poison in one of the speciescannabinum: hemp-like(Dave’s Garden Botanary)

Honeysuckle

Lonicera periclymenum Widely distributed in hedges, copses and on heaths, this is one of the most familiar of our wild flowers. It owes its popularity not only to the beauty of its flowers, but also to its sweet scent and twining habit. Flowering summer and autumn. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W.Continue reading “Honeysuckle”

Lady’s Mantle

Alchemilla vulgaris Found in moist pastures and the neighbourhood of streams, especially in hilly localities, although rather scarce in south-eastern England. Flowering from June to August. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Marsh Mallow

Althaea officinalis The Marsh Mallow is a perennial of only local occurrence, to be found in marshes near the sea, chiefly in England and Ireland; rare in Scotland and then alwasy south of the Clyde. The flowering period is during August and September The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Meadowsweet

Filipendula ulmaria Known also as Queen of the Meadows, it will be found in wet meadows, and by the sides of streams and rivers. The flowering period extends from June to August. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Navelwort

Umbilicus rupestris Known also as Wall Pennywort and Penny-pies. It should be looked for on crevices of rocks and on stone-built hedges along the western coasts of English and Scotland and in Ireland. It extends more sparingly along the south coast as far as Kent. Flowering from May to August. The Observer’s Book of WildContinue reading “Navelwort”

Primrose

Primula vulgaris Particularly abundant in Britain, in open woods and on hedgerow banks. The great flowering time is during April and May. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Ragged Robin

Lychnis flos-cuculi The Ragged Robin may be found in moist places, whether wet meadow, ditch or bog. The flowering period is from May to August. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Ragwort

Senecio jacobaea By the roadsides, in waste places and on neglected land the Ragwort may be found almost everywhere. Known in Scotland as Stinking Willie on account of the unpleasant odour of the plant when bruised. To the agriculturist generally it is an absolute nuisance, though the ordinary rambler can afford to admire the sightContinue reading “Ragwort”

Red Campion

Silene dioica To be found in moist, shady places, woods and hedge-banks. Flowering from June to September. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Red Clover

Trifolium pratense In meadows, pastures and by the roadsides the Common Red or Purple Clover may generally be found in the wild state. It has, however, been so long cultivated as a valuable fodder plant that in some localities it may not be truly indigenous. The flowering period extends from May to September The Observer’sContinue reading “Red Clover”

Selfheal

Prunella vulgaris Commonest by the wayside and in damp pastures and abundant throughout Britain. The plant is also known as Carpenter’s Herb, Hook-heal, Sickle-wort and Prunella. In olden days it was considered one of the most useful medicines for inward and outward wounds. Flowering from July to September. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiledContinue reading “Selfheal”

Snowdrop

Galanthus nivalis Although it may be found thoroughly naturalized and quite wild in orchards, copses and meadows, it is generally agreed that the Snowdrop is not indigenous to this country. Flowering from January to March. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Thrift

Armeria maritima The natural habitat of the Thrift is on the rocks and cliffs of the sea-shore or the rocky sides of high mountains. Known also as Sea Pink. Flowering from April to October The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Water Mint

Mentha aquatica In wet and marshy wastes, and on the edges of streams, the Water Mint may be found. Abundant in Britain generally, but becoming rare in the north of Scotland. Flowering in August and September. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Welsh Poppy

Meconopsis cambrica Although the name suggests that this plant is restricted to Wales, this is not actually the case. Western Poppy would, perhaps, be the more appropriate name for it. Its natural range extends from Yorkshire, southwards through Wales and Somerset to Devon and Cornwall. Its favourite haunts are beside rivulets, moist and shady rockyContinue reading “Welsh Poppy”

Wild Strawberry

Fragaria vesca Wherever there are shady banks and woodland clearings, this charming little plant is sure to be met with. Flowering nearly the whole summer. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Wood Anemone

Anemone nemorosa Anemone: Wind; or possibly corrupted from Hebrew referring to the lament for slain Adonis, whose blood produced the red Adonis or Anemone coronarianemorosa: Of the woods(Dave’s Garden Botanary) One of the earliest of the spring flowers to be found in copses, by the woodside and in upland meadows. Flowering from March to June.Continue reading “Wood Anemone”

Wood Avens

Geum urbanum Geum: Ancient Latin nameurbanum: Of cities(Dave’s Garden Botanary) On the borders of woods, in copses, and on shady hedgebanks, the Avens is abundant. Flowering chiefly between June and August. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Wood Betony

Betonica officinalis Betonica: Variant of Vettonica, a Spanish native plant, and vernacular name for Stachys officinalisofficinalis: Official – used in pharmacological sense(Dave’s Garden Botanary)

Wood Sorrel

Oxalis acetosella One of the most graceful and charming of our native plants. It abounds in moist, shady woods. A favourite position for it is the rotten centre of some old beech stump from which it will spread in a loose cluster, or growing on the ground, often in great abundance. Flowering April and MayContinue reading “Wood Sorrel”

Yellow Iris

Iris pseudacorus Fringing our rivers, ditches and lakes the Yellow Iris will be found abundantly throughout Britain. Flowering in May and continuing until late July. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Yellow Loosestrife

Lysimachia vulgaris The Yellow Loosestrife will be found on river banks and in wet, shady places, chiefly in England. The flowers are dimorphic and appear from June to August. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers, compiled by W. J. Stokoe (1957)

Yellow Rattle

Rhinanthus minor In meadows and pastures the Yellow Rattle is abundant, where it is parasitical upon the roots of other plants. The yellow flowers render it very conspicuous, and its identity is readily established by the light green inflated calyx. The flowers will be found from May to August. The Observer’s Book of Wild Flowers,Continue reading “Yellow Rattle”