I like to give things names …

I like to find the names of things. I’m not usually satisfied to title a photo ‘blue flower’ or ‘some kind of insect’. I like names. Sometimes it takes me ages to figure out what something is called, scouring various websites trying to match my plant or creature to one described.

Here are some of the things I’ve had to find names for over the last year. Most of them are things that were new to me this year, or if I’d seem them before I hadn’t found out what they were called. It’s always surprising that even though I generally stick to visiting the same areas again and again, I can still find something new!

By the way if you think any of my IDs are incorrect, please let me know – I’m always learning 🙂

Turkeytail Fungus (Trametes versicolor)
Turkeytail Fungus (Trametes versicolor)
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Honey Fungus (Armillaria mellea)
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Candlesnuff Fungus (Xylaria hypoxylon)
Ruby Tiger moth caterpillar
Ruby Tiger moth caterpillar
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Black Darter dragonfly (female)
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Black Darter dragonfly (male)
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Emerald Damselfly (male)
Sand Wasp
Sand Wasp
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Pale Toadflax (Linaria repens)
Golden-ringed Dragonfly
Golden-ringed Dragonfly
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Silver Y Moth (brown colour form) – Autographa gamma
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Buff Footman Moth

 

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Silver-ground Carpet (Xanthorhoe montanata)
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Bumblebee-mimicking Hoverfly (Volucella bombylans)
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Lacewing
Six-Spot Burnet Moth caterpillar
Six-Spot Burnet Moth caterpillar

 

4-spotted Chaser
4-spotted Chaser dragonfly
Green Hairstreak butterfly - Callophrys rubi
Green Hairstreak butterfly – Callophrys rubi
Green Tiger Beetle
Green Tiger Beetle
Bogbean
Bogbean
Thistle Tortoise Beetle - Cassida rubiginosa
Thistle Tortoise Beetle – Cassida rubiginosa
Yellow Ophion
Yellow Ophion

If you find yourself trying to identify a plant or creature, here are some really useful websites to help you. These are only relevant if you’re in the UK. I’m sure there are equivalent websites elsewhere though.

This post was inspired by the Weekly Photo Challenge: Names. I went a little off topic as it said:

This week, share a photo that includes a name… Whatever you choose, make sure we can read the name!

No actual names visible in my photos I’m afraid, but they do have names 🙂

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Time

Time can seem endless, and yet pass so swiftly at the same time.

Some creatures’ lives are so short and yet so much changes during the time they live.

This is a caterpillar of the Drinker Moth, spotted in the garden in January:

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Drinker Moth caterpillar

It’s hard to believe that after some time passes it becomes this fluffy moth (photo taken in July a couple of years back).

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Adult Drinker Moth

 

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Adult Drinker Moth

As well as butterflies and moths, one of my favourite insects undergoes a dramatic transformation over time. Dragonflies spend a large proportion of their lives underwater (one or two years usually) and then when their time in that form is up, they emerge from the water and burst out of their larval shape. They blossom into the amazing, beautiful winged form I know and love, and spend the rest of their days in flight, bringing wonder to all who see them.

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Empty casing from a newly emerged Dragonfly
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A friendly Common Darter

And just because this is my blog and I can do what I want… here’s my most favourite photo I’ve ever taken of a dragonfly 🙂

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I love this photo so much
(This photograph is available for purchase as a digital download)

Inspired by the Weekly Photo Challenge: Time

evening in the garden

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less busy now
as evening comes
and here I sit
with tea
and camera
(just in case)

no butterflies left
they’ve gone to bed
(where do they sleep?)

but still the swallows
chitter by
the out-late bees
hum-bumble low
and early moths
flutter

time slows
to a honeyed trickle
in our wild garden